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was formed by this constant re-reading and reimagining other people's ideas. >> steven johnson is our guest next sunday on in death. he is looking at computer networking and politics. live at noon eastern on c-span2. >> host: joining us now is author diana furchtgott-roth and she has, in fact, several new books coming out in the summer of 2012. this is a small little book put out by encounter. "how obama's gender policies undermine america" first of all, diana furchtgott-roth, what is this supposed to represent. >> guest: is a short and easily red booklet. this one is about gender policy. >> host: another new book put out by american enterprise institute is "women's figures". >> guest: that is meant for the playboy crowd. [laughter] >> host: this is the book "women's figures: an illustrated guide to the economic progress of women in america." i think some of the ideas are the same in both of these. which is compared with men, women in 21st century america live five years longer, facing unemployment rates that are significantly lower, are awarded a larger share of high school diplomas, bas a
and president ford nominated john paul stevens to replace him in the confirmation hearing he wasn't asked a question because it wasn't a part of the political dialogue in a way that it later became. the big issue, the big change began in 1980 with the election of ronald reagan because he brought with him to washington a very underrated figure in the recent history, some i don't think this is due as an important area and that is edwin meese because he was first an advisor and then as attorney general said look, they're has been a liberal agenda at the supreme court of their needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was the agenda? expand executive power and attend to a system for americans from a speech that execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and above all, reverse roe v wade in the last months again to the abortion. a big part of the revolution was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted it to work on behalf of the agenda. word the best and brightest in your group? john roberts and samuel alito. in 1985
douglas stepped out and forward dominic john paul stevens to replace them. in his hearing he was not asked a single question about abortion because he was not part of a political dialogue in the way that later became. the big issue, big change began in 198 1980 that goes with the election of ronald reagan ronald reagan brought with them to washington a very underrated figure in a recent american history, somehow i don't think gets his due as an important person. that's edwin meese because edwin meese at first was in flash and then attorney general. said look, there has been a liberal agenda at the supreme court. there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power and end racial preferences, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere, and above all, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution was the arrival of washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda, who were two of the best and the br
for religion. right now as you may know, justice stevens retired two years ago as a protestant on the supreme court and we now have the supreme court of six catholics and three jews. how does that happen? in some ways you could suggest that it happens but it certainly reflects is we don't see that much anymore about the accounting by religion we still force are very aware of race and ethnicity and gender, so the fact that there are now three women on the court, you know, that says something. that's approaching a kind of normalization of the notion that the women can rise to the highest ranks in the legal profession. i think we're still waiting for more diversity in the court, and race and ethnicity. but the point i actually want to make the wingback to how the court knows what it knows is until elena kagan succeeded justice stevens two years ago she had never been a judge. she came from the dean's office at harvard law school. every member of the supreme court for the first time in our history had as the last thing on their resume a seat on the federal court of appeals, and that is astonishin
] joining us live is steven carter, and he is the author among many other most ofs we have the author the." impeachment of abraham lincoln, a novel. get thereto premises that are historically inaccurate. abraham lincoln survives thepean assassination attempt and he is impeached. where do come up with this? >> i make it clear that i am a fan. it is not an argument for the impeachment but it is a novel.tion interested in presidentialf linn power the question suggest politica itself what with his political enemies that were looking for a way to get out of the way what if it is through the impeachment process? did >> when did it occur to youg to? this might be a fun thing to do? >> i remember in college rrect? following might professors t asking what would happen if. c i had to pursue it selected the court -- courtroom drama is heonomies the?to t >> it is not easy to write but it did fit into my interest per car ride about an the presidential power. taking those questions and ideas, we din did suspend the writ of habeas corpus and those who were criticalhow of the war for the court martial so
and serves as an editor of the yale law journal. clerking for steven briar, he joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor is co-editor of the leading constitutional law casebook, processes of the constitutional decision making and is the author of several of the books including the constitution in criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution and was really america's and written constitution, the precedents and principles will apply. the hon. clarence thomas has served as a justice of the supreme court for nearly 21 years. he attended seminary and received an ab from the college of the holy cross and j.d. from yale law school. serve as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977. legislative assistant to senator john denver from 1979 to 81. from 81-82 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated
as a threat from london and from other cities around the world. >> steven johnson is our guest sunday taking your calls, e-mails and tweets on in depth. the author will look at sites history, the cyber world, popular culture in computer networking and politics. live at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine, and its significance to the story of uncle tom's cabin is that in many ways the story began you. is here in this q., q. number 23, that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw a vision of uncle tom being whipped to death. now, uncle tom as you probably know as the title character of the hero of her 1852 novel, uncle tom's cabin. uncle tom's cabin was written very much as a protest novel, by anyone in the north, take a in knowing what all abolitionists lived, if anyone in the north was to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fined for breaking the law. and this was the bill which was seen as kind of the compromise between the north and south to avoid war. so that was part of what the novel was trying to d
of the ambassador chris stevens was a despicable act of terrorism. but the right responses to finish the work that chris stevens gave his life to and that is what the vast majority of libyans want, too. we saw that in ben zazi last weekend as they took to the streets refusing to allow extremists to hijack their chance for dhaka see. the arab spring has brought progress in egypt with of the democratically elected president as civilian control over the military. in yemen and tunisia where the elections support the government to power and in morocco where there is a new constitution and a prime minister appointed on the basis of the popular vote for the first time. and even further appealed somalia has also taken the first step forward by electing a new president. so there has been progress, and none of it would have come about without people standing up last year and demanding change or without this united nations having the courage to respond to the cries. second there's the argument that the removal of dictators started to unleash a new wave of violence, extremism and instability. some argue
a question here? way, way in the back, is there a microphone in that last row there? >> steven call, university of maryland. is it important for the united states to abide by international law and liberal international order and is there a way the united states could use military force against iran's nuclear program without u.n. approval and be in compliance with international law? >> who wants to take that? want to take it. >> i will take it but don't want to be droning on and on. >> then speak briefly. >> i will speak briefly. the united states, first of all, you know you can go through a lot of presidents going back to including bill clinton obviously who took military action in kosovo in that case without a u.n. security council mandate and, barack obama ran and says repeatedly that he does not consider the united states bound by to pursue its interests bound by u.n. security council resolutions. merge has i would say am by lept attitude toward international law. we are in some respects the greatest spokesman sometimes for international law but throughout our history and through
stevens was killed. i don't think it's appropriate to somehow blame the state department or the white house for this. and now obviously, we have to do everything we can to protect our people. as grow know president obama got on the phone with the president of egypt after the embassy was attacked and basically said you have to do a better job. there's is my paraphrasing what i read about the conversation in the newspaper. you have to did a better job and protect our embarrass sip. that's the right message. i think it's tined time for the americans to stand time. it's a tough time for the diplomats. they -- >> host: georgia is on the live eric on the line for democrats. hey. >> caller: yeah. i have two comments. thanks for taking my call. first of all, the g.o.p. often says there's a libbial media. that can't be phut from the truth. all media is corporate owned. when you're a tv person, all you're doing is what your boss is what you are doing. you are an employee owned by a rich people they are most part is republican. most media is right-wing. with that said, i want to talk about iran.
the people is ambassador stevens is killed, therefore let's walk away from libya. i just don't think is intellectually indefensible. you have to say, which elements of pakistan are the progressives if we believe they exist and i believe they do. which elements do have common issues with us? if we are to look forward to pakistan opening up, if we are to look forward to pakistan's energy self-sufficient has proper education up into the world economy, and therefore less susceptible perhaps to extremism in the country. i think we have to do a better job and i think many people in this room have an understanding of pakistan and gmail who are the people we had to work with? it's not pakistan as such. given the flawed relations of institutions in the country. usually choose to work with and which then how could we work i had, but we are going to create strategic partnership in 12 areas. your cyberculture, water and we're going to do bilaterally. we will have a one-size-fits-all institutional links. some of these problems are give into that kind kind of structure. so we have to say where do
, he recounts a conversation with former verizon ceo ivan steven berg and valerie jarrett from the white house and here is ivan seaton berg talking to valerie jarrett according to bob woodward. with all due respect we will be here when you are gone for climb a perfect example that he said so you have to realize that this very progressive agenda and this once-in-a-lifetime malt meant for this world can be lost because guys like me can hunker down and wait you out. >> guest: i've heard the same things. i have heard at the end of the day the president likes to appear like he is getting input from the business community but he really doesn't act on that input. because he has an ideology of the solutions that are needed for this economy and that is really where he focused, rather than speaking to business people saying okay here is what the demand picture looks like. here is what we need to ensure that we will you know put more money into the economy. i think there is a real debate right now and division frankly in this country about the solutions to the way forward. i think the bus
. >> steven johnson is our guest sunday taking your calls, e-mails and tweets on in depth. live at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> world leaders from 193 countries added for the u.n. general assembly in new york city. many of them focusing on the situation in syria. syria's foreign minister responded to some of the criticism directed at his country and said international calls for president assad to step down our blatant interference in syria and domestic affairs. his remarks are about 20 minutes. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: mr. vuk jeremic, president of the 67 session of the general assembly, i would like to congratulate you and your friendly country, the republic of serbia, on your election as president of the general assembly at its current session, and to wish you success in conducting our work in a manner that brings back to the president of the general assembly it's important and mutual -- neutral role in fulfilling his duties away from any political, national or international agendas that violate the rules of international law and contradict efforts to achiev
stevens and running around campaign and then have a conversation with mike was running the romney transition team is two different world. obama is omar khadr get and that of many private conversations with his people but i also believe he's not that dissimilar. it's a very different conversation than the one you have with jack lew or whoever is fully thinking through what obama would actually do in november, december of this year, and then the first six months of next year. so i don't think it's impossible. i think maybe it's just the way we're going to have to conduct ourselves, pivot extremely quickly after election day and get about the business of governing. i don't buy the argument that the partisanship is so bad that you can get democratic votes for republican budget or vice versa. i think there'll be a certain momentum to do with these programs where the reelected the president for elect a new president. so that will be an unusual situation, when we haven't had a long time, that degree of certainty and mandate i think. but in any case, i think, but it's not going to become
entry imagining of other people's ideas. >> steven johnson will be our get -- guest next month. the science writer and columnist for discover magazine will look at the cyberworld popular culture and computer networking and politics. lives in their october 7 at noon eastern on c-span2 book tv. up next, a debate between kendis to be the next governor of new hampshire. the republican candidates unsuccessfully ran for governor in 1996 and was the republican nominee for the u.s. senate in 2010. democrat is a former new hampshire state senator who served as the majority leader. this took place in manchester, new hampshire and comes to us from new hampshire public broadcasting and is about an hour. >> welcome to the candidates' forum on business and the economy. i am most of the exchange. we are coming to you from the television studios at the new hampshire is to to the politics that political library. for the next hour we will hear from new hampshire is gubernatorial candidates. we will press them to talk about what they would do as governor and refrain from spending valuable time at
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15